News and information for the worldwide dredging industry

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May/June - 2017 DR/LA

PERUVIAN PORT SECTOR TO INVEST $148 MIL­LION IN 2017 

The Peruvian port sector will invest more than $148 million USD in both infrastructure and equipment improvement projects in 2017, as a way to boost the country’s competitiveness, the Peruvian port authority, APN, announced in late April. The expected investments should also help several local industrial sectors, includ­ing the steelmaking, cement, bulk cargo and goods transportation industries to facilitate and increase their exports. APN expects to begin works at the country’s General San Martin Ter­minal Port, one of its key projects, between May and June this year, as part of the proposed $148 million USD investment. The project alone was estimated in $12.1 million USD. Other ini­tiatives include the rehabilitation of the Callao Port’s No. 7 quay at an estimated cost of $12.3 million USD, as well as the acquisition of both general and bulk cargo equipment for the facil­ity at an additional proposed budget of $9.8 mil­lion USD. Out of the announced $148 million USD investment, the country’s Chancay Port should receive the largest amount of resources: $95.5 million USD, whose money is expected to be used in the remainder of the year. 

CHINESE DREDGE TO RESTORE NAVIGABILITY OF ITAJAI-ACU RIVER IN BRAZIL 

A Chinese dredge owned by state-run con­struction giant China Communications Con­struction Company Limited (CCCC) Shangai Dredging Co will restore the depth of the Itajai- Acu River, near the Itajai Port, located in the city of same name in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina, to about 45.9 feet (14 meters.) The Chinese dredge named Xin Hai Niu was hired by Brazilian company DTA Engenharia at a cost of BRL 38.8 million ($12.6 million USD) to ex­tract about 4 million cubic meters of jetsam in the river, whose navigability was compromised in September 2015 due to intense rains in the re­gion. Dredging should take place in the next few months with money from the country’s Ministry of Transports, Ports and Civil Aviation. As dredg­ing advances, the port’s ability to receive larger vessels will increase. The dredge is 134.4 meters (about 441 feet) in length, is 28 meters (about 92 meters) large, and has a 6.5-meter-long (about 21-foot) draft. It was built in 2009 and has been operating in Itajai, Brazil, since late April. 

COLOMBIAN BUENAVENTURA PORT READY TO RECEIVE LARGER VESSELS 

The Colombian Port of Buenaventura is now ready to receive larger vessels thanks to a recent­ly completed dredging project at the facility’s quay. Vessels with a 60,000 tons carrying capac­ity can now dock at the port, after the $950,000 USD dredging project, which increased the port’s quay access channel to 44.2 feet (13.5 meters,) was completed. The initiative was car­ried out by local conglomerate Ventura Group and its subsidiary Grupo Portuario. Jan De Nul’s trailing suction hopper dredge (TSHD) Filippo Brunelleschi was used in the project, extracting 67,113 cubic meters of sediment. 

VENEZUELAN GOVERNMENTS DISCUSS DREDGING AT THE ESCALANTE RIVER 

Venezuelan government officials at federal, state and city levels started discussions over the dredging of the local Escalante River, which drains into the Maracaibo Lake. Debates involv­ing the country’s Ministry of Eco-Socialism and Waters, MINEA, the state of Zulia and the city of Colon took place in late April with the aim of preparing dredging at a spillway section of the river. The mayor of Colon, Maria Malpica, said about VEF 25 million ($2.4 million USD) was available to execute the first phase of the proposed dredging project, out of which VEF 15 million ($1.48 million USD) came from the own city resources. Jose Gonzalez, Colon City’s coordinator of socio-productive development, estimated dredging should be performed in about two and a half months. A T-2000 dredge model with a 3,500 cubic meter capacity as well as a multi-functional vessel would be used to extract the sediment along the river. A state-run com­pany owned by the state of Zulia and the na­tion’s Instituto Nacional de Canalizaciones, INCANAL, which oversees the administration, financing, maintenance, study, improvement and inspection of all of Venezuela’s sea, lake and navigation channels, should also be created to perform the proposed dredging project. 

Representatives of the Venezuelan Ministry of Eco-Socialism, MINEA, the state of Zulia and the city of Colon discuss dredging at the Escalante River. Photo credit: MINEA.


TENDERING TO SELL DREDGE TO PUNO CITY IN PERU ENDS UP EMPTY 

A tendering to sell a dredge to the Peruvian city of Puno ended up empty, as none of the final four companies selected to the sell the equip­ment showed up in a meeting in late April aimed at announcing the winner. A new tendering was expected for mid-May, but no deal was closed at presstime. EMPSA Puno, the city’s sanitation company, opened the bidding to buy the equip­ment, so it could dredge the Lake Titicaca near the Puno Bay. EMPSA Puno said the tendering’s situation has been monitored by the country’s Ministry of Housing and Construction. 

JAN DE NUL WINS VERACRUZ DREDGING CONTRACT IN MEXICO 
Jan De Nul was awarded a contract for the deepening of the Port of Veracruz, located in the city and state of same name in Mexico. The deal is worth EUR 60 million ($67 million USD), the company said, adding areas to be dredged include the port’s access channel and its turning basin. The company estimated more than 13 million cubic meters should be removed and reclaimed during the project. “On top of the reclaimed ar­eas five new port terminals will be constructed. These terminals will be able to handle up to 100 million tons per year, which is more than the yearly tonnage handling of the largest ports of Mexico, i.e. Lazaro Cardenas and Manzanillo,” the company said. According to Jan De Nul, works should commence this summer and are expected to be completed by March next year. 

Jan De Nul’s CSD dredge Margo Polo will be used to extract 13 million cubic meters of sediments. Photo credit: Jan De Nul.

 

COMPLETION OF DREDGING AT BRAZIL’S CABE­DELO PORT CRUCIAL FOR MINERALS EXPORTS 

The completion of dredging at the Brazilian Port of Cabedelo, located in the city of same name in the state of Paraiba, is seen by local in­dustrial segments as crucial for the state’s miner­al exports. The president of Paraiba’s federation of industries, FIEP, Francisco de Assis Gadelha, met in April with politicians representing the northeast state of Paraiba in Brazil’s federal dis­trict, Brasilia, who promised to seek a BRL 50 million ($15.7 million USD) investment from the federal government to complete the un­fished dredging at the port’s draft, whose depth is at 29.5 feet (9 meters.) The port’s dredging project commenced in July 2010, but the ex­isting contract the state of Paraiba had with contracted company Enterpa Engenharia Ltda was breached in May 2012, when works were 90 percent complete. Gadelha argued the local industrial sector wants the port’s draft to have a 11-meter depth to allow minerals exports. 

JAN DE NUL TO DREDGE ARGENTINIAN PORT OF SAN PEDRO 

Jan De Nul’s subsidiary in Argentina, Com­pania Sudamericana de Dragados, is expected to continue dredging at the Argentinian Port of San Pedro, in the province of Buenos Aires, local port administrator Consorcio de Gestion del Puerto de San Pedro announced. Dredging is expected to keep the port operational, as the facility faced financial troubles, halting previous dredging performed by the local Jan De Nul sub­sidiary. The local port administrator said money from the province of Buenos Aires helped the struggling company to renegotiate the terms of the deal and meet overdue obligations before Compania Sudamericana de Dragados. The local Jan De Nul subsidiary will use its THSD Alvar Nueez Cabeza de Vaca, which is already in Ar­gentinian soil. 

 

 

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