News and information for the worldwide dredging industry

Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print

July/August 2017 - DR/LA

ARGENTINA’S PORT OF MAR DEL PLATA EX­PECTS DELAYED DREDGING TO FINISH SOON

Port administrator Consorcio Portuario Re­gional de Mar Del Plata expects to “soon” finish delayed dredging at the country’s Port of Mar Del Plata, located in the city of same name in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. As previously reported by International Dredging Review (IDR), Spanish dredge operator Can­lemar SL began maintenance dredging at the local port in February this year. At the time, the port’s administrator estimated the project to cost around ARS 56 million ($3.30 million US). Dredging was expected to be completed in May, but wasn’t completed until early July. Consorcio Portuario Regional de Mar Del Plata had esti­mated a June deadline for the Omvac 10 dredge to finish works.

SALVADORIAN PORT AUTHORITY PLANS 2018 DREDGING FOR LA UNION PORT

The Salvadorian Port Authority (CEPA) said in June it plans to dredge the access chan­nel of the La Union Centroamericana Port, in the city of El Salvador, next year. Despite not disclosing a specific timeline for the proposed dredging project, CEPA said it should first perform cleaning works to remove rocks and sediments near the lakes, bays and the port’s surrounding channel accesses. The Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) should complete a preliminary sedimentation study about the costs of maintenance dredging for the port’s access channel to its terminal dur­ing both the dry and wet seasons, said Nelson Vanegas, president at CEPA. Additionally, the South Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisher­ies (MOF) is reportedly designing two master plans for El Salvador’s Acajutla and La Union Centroamericana ports, in the department of Sonsonate, following a memorandum of under­standing (MoU) signed by the two countries in August 2015. Both port terminals are managed by CEPA. The Salvadorian La Union Cen­troamericana Port hasn’t moved a single con­tainer since 2013, according to a media report from MundoMaritimo. “We have always con­tinued maintenance dredging at our port. We have it at good conditions, and we seek to keep it that way until we launch a tender,” Vargas said.

EXPANSION OF BRAZILIAN PORT OF PECEM DELAYED ONCE AGAIN

Current expansion works at Brazil’s Port of Pecem, in the state of Ceara, were postponed for the end of this year, following delays. Expansion works at the Brazilian port are 85 percent com­pleted, and slowly advanced in the past seven months. In November 2016, only 81 percent of the expansion works at the facility were com­pleted. Expansion works include new berths 7, 8 and 9, which are expected to receive cargo ships and container carriers. The port expects to receive larger vessels, including the Panamax, the Post Panamax as well as Ultra Large Con­tainer Vessels. The Port of Pecem has six work­ing berths: two at its first pier, two in the second and an additional two at its Multiple Utilities Terminal (TMUT), reaching up an average depth of 18 meters (59 feet).

The expansion of the Port of Pecem in Brazil is 85 percent complete but delayed. Photo: ADECE

MEXICAN CITY SEEKS REGULATOR HELP TO ADVANCE DREDGING

The Mexican city of Guasave, in the state of Sinaloa, is seeking the help of the country’s Na­tional Water Commission, CONAGUA, to ad­vance a proposed MXN 43 million ($2.39 mil­lion US) dredging project for the local Sinaloa River. The mayor of Guasave, Diana Armenta, said guaranteeing safe river levels is a matter of public safety. Talking to local media, she rec­ognized CONAGUA has “limited resources,” however, she didn’t anticipate a timeline for re­ceiving aid from the Mexican government. The about seven years. Silting in the river is becom­ing a concerning issue for the local city admin­istration, which it says followed all the needed steps to receive federal money.

HYPACK RESELLER ORGANIZES SEMINAR IN COLOMBIA

DISSMAN, HYPACK’s reseller in Colombia, held its first HYPACK meeting in the country this year. The event held from May 10 through 12 at the Caribe Hotel, in the city of Cartagena, covered most components of the software. “In 2017, we focused on multibeam surveys, and this was very well received by the attendees due to the increasing number of HYSWEEP® us­ers in the country,” the company said on a June newsletter. HYPACK said it plans to organize a seminar on its DredgePack product, following request from local users. “We are looking into it, with the help of Jose Antonio Vasquez, DISS­MAN general manager, and we hope to define a date and a place soon,” HYPACK said.

DREDGING AT MADEIRA RIVER IN BRAZIL TO BEGIN IN AUGUST

Dredging at Brazil’s Madeira River, located between the states of Amazonas and Rondo­nia, should commence in August, according to the Brazilian Department of Infrastructure of Transportation, DNIT. The national highway department is waiting for water levels at the Madeira River to decline a bit further to then commence dredging. It could either begin by the end of July or early August, according to a DNIT official. The JEED-EPC consortium, a partner­ship involving JEED Engenharia and EPC Con­struções, will dredge the Madeira River, one of the biggest tributaries of the Amazon, following a BRL 80 million ($24.4 million US) contract signed in November in the city of Porto Velho, in the state of Rondonia. Dredging should take about five years.

ECUADORIAN GOVERNMENT TO CONTRIBUTE $20 MILLION US TO DREDGE GUAYAS RIVER

The Ecuadorian government has committed to spend $20 million US to help the province of Guayas dredge the local Guayas River. The province will, in turn, spend another $44 mil­lion US, according to local newspaper El Uni­verso. The promise to invest $20 million US came as government officials from federal and province levels met at the Carondelet Palace, in Quito. They included Ecuadorian president Lenin Moreno; the leader of the Democratic Center, Jimmy Jairala; as well as former presi­dent Abdala ‘Dalo’ Bucaram Pulley. No further details for the potential dredging project were disclosed.

BRAZILIAN PORT OF SANTOS GETS OPERAT­ING LICENSE

In April, the Brazilian environment author­ity, IBAMA, granted an operating license (OL) for the country’s busy Port of Santos. According to state-run port administrator Companhia Docas do Estado de Sao Paulo, CODESP, the licensing process involved, among other things, the development of programs aimed at protect­ing the environment. Jose Alex Oliva, director-president at CODESP, said the OL will help the Port of Santos reduce costs. Oliva said that by securing an OL, the Port of Santos sends the message to both the private sector and the international markets that it meets all safety requirements. According to official estimates, the Port of Santos accounts for about 30 to 40 percent of the Brazilian gross domestic product (GDP). The ceremony was held on April 26 in the country’s federal district, Brasilia, with sev­eral government officials, including Environ­ment Minister, Sarney Filho, IBAMA’s Presi­dent, Suely Araujo, and the National Secretary of Ports for the country’s Ministry of Transports, Ports and Civil Aviation, Luiz Otavio Oliveira Campos. As the Port of Santos secures the OL, it commits to executing 25 environment pro­grams. Currently, 13 environment initiatives are taking place, with others being developed.

Add your comment:
Edit Module