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Damen Delivers Second Cutter Suction Dredge to Van Oord

In November, Daman Dredging Equipment held a naming ceremony in Nijkerk, the Netherlands, for the second of Van Oord’s Model 650 cutter suction dredges, the Mangystau.

In November, Daman Dredging Equipment held a naming ceremony in Nijkerk, the Netherlands, for the second of Van Oord’s Model 650 cutter suction dredges, the Mangystau.

On November 16, Damen Dredging Equipment held a naming ceremony in Nijkerk, the Netherlands, for the second of Van Oord’s Model 650 cutter suction dredges, the Mangystau. The naming ceremony was performed by Ms J.P.T.M. Verwijs, wife of the chairman of Van Oord’s Works Council.

Van Oord said the Mangystau has been given the coastal waters classification. After its delivery, the vessel was transported by road and became operation on Van Oord projects in the Caspian Sea.

Damen received the first order from Van Oord for a CSD650 at the end of 2014. The Ural River had a six-week delivery turnaround and was made with in-stock options to deliver the project in the critical time.

The second order for the Mangystau was not under such time constraints and gave Van Oord the time to customize the vessel with additional tank capacity and safety and environmental features.

Joroen van Woerkum, sales manager for Damen, said the second vessel included additional bowheight pontoons to allow the dredge to obtain the BV, Coastal Operation class; a zero spill fluid containment systems, including driptrays at all fill and discharge points; and a hose management system. The spare parts package will also be available to both vessels.

The Mangystau is 61 meters (200 feet) long, with a 10.6-meter (35-foot) beam. The total installed capacity on the engine is 2,972 kW. The cutter capacity is 700 kW. The dredge has 1,826 kW dredging pump capacity and a 18-meter (59-foot) maximum dredging depth.

Damen said initial feedback regarding the first vessel is encouraging, indicating a substantial increase in production, in combination with a significant reduction in fuel consumption and a reduced crew requirement.

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