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Randive Performs Emergency Repairs on New York after Collision

Leaders of the team of more than 20 people who worked on the emergency repair are from left, Dan Muirhead, Jr., Santos Manuel and Antonio Carmo – welding supervisors from Brady Marine, and Keith Michalski and Robert Ross - diving supervisors from Randive. In the background is the stabilized New York. Randive photo.

Leaders of the team of more than 20 people who worked on the emergency repair are from left, Dan Muirhead, Jr., Santos Manuel and Antonio Carmo – welding supervisors from Brady Marine, and Keith Michalski and Robert Ross - diving supervisors from Randive. In the background is the stabilized New York. Randive photo.

Friday morning: The bow of the dredge is under water, oil booms are in place and the dredge is partially stabilized. GLDD photo.

Friday morning: The bow of the dredge is under water, oil booms are in place and the dredge is partially stabilized. GLDD photo.

The Randive and Great Lakes D&D crews worked through the night to remove the huge tires and chains from the damaged area. The deck is six feet under water in this picture. GLDD photo.

The Randive and Great Lakes D&D crews worked through the night to remove the huge tires and chains from the damaged area. The deck is six feet under water in this picture. GLDD photo.

The cofferdam Randive installed over the gash is visible above the waterline, and a pump is in place removing water from the flooded compartment. Bouyancy was restored by Friday evening, the day after the collision, allowing the repair crew to enter the

The cofferdam Randive installed over the gash is visible above the waterline, and a pump is in place removing water from the flooded compartment. Bouyancy was restored by Friday evening, the day after the collision, allowing the repair crew to enter the

In drydock: the 17-foot-long crescent-shaped gash was revealed after the cofferdam was removed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The Randive crew performed the emergency repair underwater before the water could be pumped out of the dredge. Randive photo.

In drydock: the 17-foot-long crescent-shaped gash was revealed after the cofferdam was removed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The Randive crew performed the emergency repair underwater before the water could be pumped out of the dredge. Randive photo.

The internal welded cofferdam comprises three tons of steel, and took Randive and Brady crews 36 hours to complete. The cofferdam isolated compartments of the dredge affected by the damage. Randive photo.

The internal welded cofferdam comprises three tons of steel, and took Randive and Brady crews 36 hours to complete. The cofferdam isolated compartments of the dredge affected by the damage. Randive photo.

On Thursday, January 24th, Randive, Inc. received an urgent phone call from Great Lakes Dredge & Dock requesting immediate dispatch of dive teams to the dredge New York. At 1:50 p.m., the 669-foot outbound motor vessel Orange Sun had struck the dredge in Newark Bay as it was beginning work on the Newark Bay 50-foot Deepening Project #4. Within 45 minutes of the initial call, a six-man dive team was on site.

Randive is headquartered in Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

The dredge was being held up by its three spuds, but in the flood tide, the water level was increasing inside the dredge.

The dive team was requested to penetrate into a flooded storage room to begin an internal assessment, and they were able to pump water from that area, returning some buoyancy to the dredge. After pumping down the storage area, the team ascertained that the damage was isolated to the winch room, aft of the excavator. Upon returning some stability to the vessel, Randive’s next task was to determine the location and extent of damage.

An inspection diver on the outside of the dredge found a 17-foot by two-foot tear on the port side, at approximately frame 38, in way of the winch room. The damaged area was behind large tire fenders.
Working throughout the night with underwater burning equipment, the dive team and dredge crew were able to remove the tire fenders – excavator tires six to eight feet in diameter – and other obstructions. This revealed the long, crescent-shaped tear where the ship had hit the dredge.

The next morning, Friday, after receiving approval from the owners, Randive began extensive in-water repairs on the damaged hull, which took approximately eight hours. By 3 p.m. the damage was sealed off and pumping operations began. Within four hours the dredge had regained buoyancy and was floating.

The next phase was to perform an internal inspection of the damage. The team decided to fabricate an internal cofferdam to isolate the area surrounding the damaged hull. Working with Brady Marine Repair Co., Inc. of Elizabeth, New Jersey, Randive spent Saturday assembling materials for an internal welded cofferdam – a total of about three tons of steel. By the evening of Saturday, January 26th, the Randive dive teams and Brady welders began working around the clock, and had completed the cofferdam by the morning of Monday, January 28th.

Other repairs took the rest of the week, and the dredge was towed to drydock at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a distance of 13 miles - on Saturday, February 2.

Randive was also retained to make an inspection of the hull of the Orange Sun, which then continued to Florida for repairs.

All work was performed to the highest of safety standards and to the approval of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The successful completion of the hull repairs was a culmination of the unwavering cooperation between Randive, Great Lakes Dredge & Dock, Brady Marine, the Corps of Engineers and the United States Coast Guard.

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