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Eagle Deepening Oxnard Channel

Eric Seagren, left, of DSC explains the controls to dredge operator Brad Jamour.

Eric Seagren, left, of DSC explains the controls to dredge operator Brad Jamour.

Eagle North America is dredging a water intake channel for Reliant Electric in Oxnard, California, using a 10-inch Barracuda Class dredge purchased from Dredging Supply Company



The project involves removing 70,000 cubic yards of sand and silt from a water intake channel. The channel draws water from the Pacific Ocean for the power plant cooling towers, and had silted in so that at extreme low tide the plant was unable to draw in enough water to operate all the generators. If this situation coincided with peak power demand, the plant couldn't generate enough power to fill the demand.



Eagle contacted Ed Bond of Advanced Marine, a DSC sales representative, and placed the order. The dredge was launched in May, 2003 - two weeks after the purchase was made, and dredging began in the summer.



A requirement for the project was that the dredge include a California Air Resources Board (CARB) certified Tier II engine to meet the state's strict air quality standards. The dredge can be operated as either a swing wire or swinging ladder dredge.



"To configure the dredge as required by Eagle, we removed the existing Caterpillar 3406 DITA engine and replaced it with a Caterpillar C15 E-series diesel engine," said Bob Wetta, Chief Operations Officer/ Sales, at Dredging Supply Company. "The two engines are physically similar, but the C15 boasts an additional 15hp, with an intermittent rating of 475 bhp @ 2100 rpm. An air to air after-cooler system was required to cool the C15 engine. We also modified the existing cooling system and rerouted additional 'fuel and water plumbing', he said.



The channel is 7800 feet long, 100 feet wide, and is being dredged to -12 feet. The initial pumping length is 1500 feet, and the dredge is discharging into 60-foot-circumference Geotubes. Because of limited space, the dredge must fill the tubes and allow them to drain. The dredged material is then hauled to a local landfill, where it is used as alternative daily cover. New tubes are then laid, and the process begins again. The project will take a total of 15,000 linear feet of Geotubes, said Dennis Allen, general manager of Eagle North America.



By the end of the project, the dredge will be pumping up to 9300 feet, and a booster pump will be added at the halfway mark.



Randy Gillespie is project manager, working with a dredge operator, shore hand, booster operator and Geotube watch person. The project will be complete in spring of 2004.


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