News and information for the worldwide dredging industry

January-February 2000

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Great Lakes Receives Hammer Award

Massachusetts Senator Edward M. Kennedy and Congressman J. Joseph Moakley, Massachusetts 9th District, presented the Hammer Award to Great Lakes Dredge & Docks president Doug Mackey on February 28. The ceremony took place at the Fish Pier Conference Center, overlooking Boston Harbor.

NALMS to Celebrate 20th Anniversary

The 20th Anniversary International Symposium of NALMS (North American Lake Management Society) will be held at the Wyndyam Hotel Miami - Biscayne Bay, Miami, Florida, November 8 10, 2000.

EdgeTech Hires Agent

Edgetech has appointed Sea and Land Technologies Pte. Ltd., Singapore, as the company's exclusive Asia Pacific Rim service center for service and repairs of the companys products, including side scan sonars, full spectrum sub-bottom profilers and acoustic releases.

New WINOPS Has Hydro Survey Features

Lyman Burk has incorporated elements in his WINOPS version 4.5.11 dredge positioning software that make it a hydrographic survey program.

Ballast Nedam, Van Oord Consider Merger

Ballast Nedam NV, Zeist, the Netherlands, is considering a merger with Van Oord BV or Gorinchem, the Netherlands. Ballast Nedam CEO Rene Kottman said that the companies activities complement each other well and that the merger would benefit both.

Contractors and Geotechnical Information

When it comes to reviewing geotechnical reports, boring logs, and other information about subsurface conditions, contractors need not be experts. With respect to analysis of geotechnical information, contractors are judged by the standard of a reasonable and prudent contractor in the industry.

Ziegler is New GIW President

Ziegler is New GIW President

Dennis Ziegler has been named president and CEO of GIW Industries, Grovetown, Georgia. He is also president of the Mining Division of KSB, parent company of GIW.

Corps Studies Columbia Deepening

The Corps of Engineers is in the final year of a five-year study to assess the feasibility of improving the Columbia River channel. The study area is from the mouth of the river, upstream to the Interstate 5 bridge between Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington, and from the mouth of the Willamette River upstream to the Broadway Bridge in Portland.

St. Louis District Using Micro Model

The St. Louis District Corps of Engineers is using a laser scanner to measure riverbed elevations in its micro river modeling system. This system relies on accurate measurements of the river bed model to determine sediment deposition and scour under simulated flow conditions. Capturing elevations with a mechanical digitizer requires an engineer to actually touch hundreds of points on the bed to capture their coordinates, which takes about 30 minutes and is subject to error because of the variability induced by a human operator positioning the probe. Also, the bed is not a hard surface, so the operator must take care not to disturb it. A laser scanner captures elevations in 10 minutes, using a laser light that moves over the surface. With this method, nothing physically touches the model. The difference in cost between the two methods has been estimated at $10,000 per study. The micro river model was developed and is operated by the Applied River Engineering Center at St. Louis, Missouri. This is an extremely small scale, physical sediment transport model.

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